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Review of sucker punching video

This topic contains 6 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  Christopher 1 week ago.

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  • #5679

    donweiss
    Participant

    Here is an interesting link – https://ninetymilesfromtyranny.blogspot.com/2017/04/how-to-avoid-getting-sucker-punched.html.

    I watched it, and got to thinking (always a dangerous thing, thinking) – one of the video lessons from AKTS was on the use of the turning movement in the warmup (I always knew the move as Tai Chi Turning). It comes up from a low position, striking through the target (with the palm heel or cupped palm). It takes into account the same points as the video describes – effects of stress (tunnel vision), use of hand position, and body position (shoulder alignment)comments? Not so much in the defense (which the video points out in the conclusion) – but on the use of a first strike.

  • #6073

    Kuntaoer
    Participant

    It’s really cool that you noticed this. YES, arm swinging is a beginning component of training refined strikes similar to the ‘street’ sucker punch. Arm swinging is a common exercise in Chinese martial arts, but we take it to some peculiar places. You can see that people instinctively understand the lines it teaches – and those lines can have devastating effect for a wide range of reasons. That said, our school of KTS has an entire training program built around it to teach much, much more than sucker punching.

  • #6074

    Duane
    Participant

    Hello Kuntaoer, is the video posted some where else?

  • #6075

    Kuntaoer
    Participant

    I noticed if you click on it, in the video rectangle, there is a link to view it on Facebook.

  • #6076

    Kuntaoer
    Participant
  • #6083

    Duane
    Participant

    Oh. It is no longer up?

  • #6141

    Christopher
    Participant

    Click “watch on facebook” and it should open this: https://www.facebook.com/londonwingchunacademy/videos/1277978942244722/

    When I have a guy getting aggressive on me that close, my first instinct is to put my hands up on him like I’m feeling the range with my fingers. It’s often called a “fence”. My next instinct is to establish a distance so I have time to react. I don’t trust any block to stop an opening shot from up close, so the objective is to get out of the danger zone, and if he doesn’t let me out, I will smash him if he so much as twitches at me.

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